Alfonso Cuarón’s Philosophy For Children Of Men Carried Over To The Cinematography

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Alfonso Cuarón’s Philosophy For Children Of Men Carried Over To The Cinematography

“Children of Men,” which celebrated its 15th-anniversary last year, is highly regarded as Alfonso Cuarón’s dystopian masterpiece. Loosely adapted from PD James’s novel of the same name, the film is set in a not-too-distant future where humans have faced total infertility for eighteen years straight. In this war-torn world, the United Kingdom is one of the only nations still standing; a total police state that has completely outlawed immigration.

Working with his regular cinematographer, Emmanuel Lubezki, Cuarón’s signature floating camera style is as hypnotic as it is functional. As a filmmaker that’s consistently working in different genres and tones, his directorial style is always felt in the way he commands the camera, stuffing as much information into the frame as possible. It’s in the wide open beach landscapes of “Y Tu Mamá También,” and in this time-distorting way his lens explores Hogwarts through the seasons in “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.”

Cuarón’s love for the one-shot is always a spectacle to behold, and the technique reaches its apex in “Children of Men.” When Coming Soon spoke with Cuarón back around the film’s release in 2006, Cuarón revealed that even though the scope is significantly larger than his previous films, his filmic philosophies and impulses were approached the same way.

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